Betty Boop’s Summer Sun Care Tips

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Betty Boop Swim with PudgyHi Friends!  Summer is in full swing, and if there is one thing Betty Boop does when the sun is out is protect her skin!  It’s one of her secrets to keeping her youthful glow, along with protecting her skin from the damaging rays.

Summer is one of Betty’s favorite times of year.  She adores fun in the sun!  But, sunburns and damage caused by too much sun are no fun, so Betty always makes sure she protects her skin… in a full Betty style, of course.

So, how does Betty stay glam and protect her skin at the same time?  Here are her top 3 tips:

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Happy Birthday, Max!

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Max and me in Miami, Florida
Circa 1940. Collection: V. Mahoney

MAX and Me
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by Ginny Mahoney
Granddaughter of Betty Boop’s creator, Max Fleischer

Since tomorrow — July 19th — is Max’s birthday, I thought I’d celebrate by sharing some fun facts about the man himself.

Max was born in 1883, the second eldest of Wilhelm and Amelia Fleischer’s six children. From a very early age, he had a restless, inquiring mind always eager to learn, understand and explain the world around him, and growing up in New York offered fertile ground for his active and adventurous imagination. He loved to draw, was fascinated by machines and for a time he even considered becoming an engineer. Max was also greatly influenced by his father’s love of music. All six of the Fleischer children played instruments and growing up, Max and his siblings enjoyed many evenings at home playing music together. Click to enlarge Continue reading

When Betty Boop was … a REDHEAD!

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Max and me in Miami, Florida
Circa 1940. Collection: V. Mahoney

MAX and Me
by Ginny Mahoney
Granddaughter of Betty Boop’s creator, Max Fleischer
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Click to enlargeThe year was 1934 and Betty was starring in Poor Cinderella, the first color film to be made by Fleischer Studios. All of Betty’s previous films were in black and white. In fact, this is the only color film that Betty appeared in during the 1930s.

Although there had been early experiments in the use of color in film, color didn’t become practical until the 1930s. At that time there were several different color processes being tried. Walt Disney had secured exclusive rights from 1932-35 to use what was called the “3-strip Technicolor” process. Continue reading